Posted in history

Lightship on Abergele beach

Further to Alan Jones comment about the Lightship being washed up on the beach. I posted a reply under Tank Traps on the beach relating my memories of what this vessel really was. This is a picture of one of the Mersey sea lane markers, complete with light, washed up on Formby Beach. I believe it was one of these that was washed up in the early 60’s and not a full blown Lightship. Apparently the occurrence of them breaking their moorings has been frequent over the years. Does this picture awake anyone’s memories ?

Posted in gems topography traditions

And now, like this

It’s nice to look back at good old Woolies. When that company came to an end, many high streets in towns around Britain lost their iconic meeting places. I’d say we’ve been luckier than most in Abergele. The Diskos shop that takes the place of Woolworth isn’t all that different from Woolworth. OK, so you can’t buy Ladybird children’s clothes, there’s no record department, there are no stick-on shoe soles and metal sole ‘inserts’, but I think Diskos is a bit of a gem. The staff are friendly and I see people chatting together just as they used to in the old Woolies. The high street shops are vital to the heart of our towns and I think Abergele’s lucky in that respect.

Diskos, Market St. Abergele

Posted in history

To this….

To this. Yes I remember. My sister worked there for years. Sad really.

Posted in gems history

Woolworth

Remember this?

F W Woolworth Market St Abergele

Posted in history

Abergele/Pensarn station

Previous posts talked about Abergele/Pensarn station as it used to be with the over-rail walkway etc. I found these pictures of a scale model railway layout of the station as it was around 1960. I’ve posted them to remind us all how it used to look. I’m sure you will agree with me it is an excellent model and an interesting reminder of past times. I can remember, as a child, the excitement of the arrival of the first diesel trains, how different today when the same enthusiasm is felt at the sight of steam trains. Pictures are reproduced by kind permission of Rhyl & District Model Railway Club. You can see their activities at http://www.penmorfa.com/rdmrc/

Posted in history

Jolly Fryer/Glasklad

Glassklad batteries started in 1952. They manufactured batteries using cells made in Manchester, hence it was also known as “Manchester Batteries”. It was originally located in Turnpike cottages, where the Jolly Fryer, now a Chinese Take Away, is now. In the 1700’s, the old Turnpike road used to run down Peel Street and up Groes Lwyd on its way to Llanddulas, there was a toll cottage nearby known as the Peel Toll. The Turnpike Cottages were the Toll house and by 1860 , as the toll roads disappeared, it had become a shop and a bakery . The memories of “Glassklad” remind me of when we used to walk to school up Church Walk steps. In those days you could see down into the works through the now bricked up window on the side parallel to the steps. I used to walk to school from Clwyd Avenue with Dad, who was a teacher in the “Nashy”. He used to lift me up to peer into the gloom of the workshop. What a site it was for a child, men bustling about with fires seemingly everywhere and large pots of molten metal. All a bit terrifying, for a six year old. As we grew up we no longer needed Dad’s assistance to look in, we could do that by climbing on the steps hand rail. When I got up to the Grammar School, I used to still walk up the steps every morning to go to the Visitor Office to do my paper round. Co-incidentally, I used to deliver papers to the house I now live in, nearly fifty years later. It was a measure of growing up then, being able to see into the workshop without being lifted or climbing on the rail. Glassklad moved in 1969 to premises near to the Tunnel to the High Street, where they remain, albeit under another name, in business today.

Posted in topography

From on high

Here’s an interesting old photo from the air of old Abergele. A few things to note…

The old police cell is there next to the chapel.
The old warehouse is there in all its glory. The mill is obscured.
The chapel’s row of cottages next to the playing fields han’t yet been built. Neither had Gele Ave. There are lots of empty fields behind the Gwindy.

A fascinating photo from Mark Roberts and Mark Baker’s excellent book

Posted in history

Gwrych Castle Heyday

Further to my post showing the model train in Gwrych Castle. I was reliving the heddy days of the Castle when I came across this picture which shows how popular it was in the 50’s. I believe this was taken in 1951.

Posted in history

Postcard

Many thanks to the Abergele Post. I now have a good copy of the postcard I was searching for. Also, I have reacquainted myself with someone from my youth. Now lets all keep those contributions going to this hugely interesting site. Lets commit our memories to print for all to enjoy.

Posted in history

Pentre Mawr