Posted in gems history

Wades of Abergele

I think everyone has fond memories of Wades the bakers. I went to school with Byron Wade. His father coached Glan Morfa football team. His sister was a journalist on the Abergele Visitor – another much-loved icon of Abergele. Every Saturday, I was sent to collect our weekly order from Mrs Grace. Yes, it’s sad to think of Abergele without Wades.

Wades of Abergele

Posted in history postcards

The Lecture Hall, Pentre Mawr

Pentre Mawr Abergele lacture hall

Posted in books gems history

Pleasure grounds of Bee Hotel in 1860s

Following my post of an 1860s advert for the Bee Hotel with its pleasure grounds, in the same publication, I found this engraving actually showing them:

1860s engraving of Bee Hotel, Abergele

After seeing the original post, Huw added a comment, saying the
“Pleasure grounds are probably Bee Fields, where the library, clinic and car park are now located.”

Well, looking at this engraving, Huw’s exactly right.

Posted in books gems

Bee Hotel advertisement in Bradshaw’s Tourist Handbook

“Pleasure grounds in front” – I wonder what they were? Here’s 1860s ad for the Bee Hotel, Abergele, from Bradshaw’s Tourist Handbook:
Bee Hotel Abergele advertisement in Bradshaw's Tourist Handbook of 1860s
I came across it when trying to find a copy of the book Michael Portillo referred to in his Great Railway Journeys programme on TV. The actual book used is scarce but this is the blog post that helped me find a downloadable online version of the full book. Thanks to University of Michigan, I’ve been able to print a copy of the book for my father who enjoys travelling this island’s railways.

Posted in appeals gems postcards

Seeking pic of Elfod teacher with bike by Woolies

I’ve just received this appeal from David Hughes who’s returned to live in his childhood town of Abergele:
“..My Dad was Mr Lloyd Hughes, teacher in Abergele junior school. I’m trying to get hold of a postcard of him stood by his bike outside Woolies. Think it was taken mid 60′s. If anyone can help I’d be most thankful.”
If you know how David can get hold of this image of his father outside Woolworths’ Market St., please use the comments form on this page.

Posted in Dai-aspora gems history traditions

The 18 most-searched for Welsh words

“What’s x in Welsh?”, “Welsh word for y” … I’ve been researching words people search for on Google using phrases like these.
Here’s the Top 18:

1 Wales – Cymru
2 thank you – diolch
3 love – cariad
4 John – Sion
5 blue – glas
6 carrot – moron
7 I love you – dwi’n dy garu di
8 goodbye – hwyl fawr
=8 good morning – bore da
10 microwave – ffwrn meicrodon or popty-ping
11 hello – su’mae?
12 grandmother – nain or mam-gu
13 services – gwasanaethau
14 how are you? – sut wyt ti?
15 family – teulu
16 sheep – dafad (one) or defaid (plural)
17 good luck – pob lwc
18 beautiful – prydferth

number 6 of 18 carrot=moron

Source Google Keyword tool, based on collation of monthly search queries around concepts of English-language keywords connected with ‘welsh’, ‘word’ and ‘translation’. Accessed January 2010 by Gareth Morlais.

P.S. a bit off-topic as far as Abergele news goes, but I hope you’ll share this if you find it interesting.

 

(Originally published 12 January 2011)

Posted in books history

When Richard II hid near Abergele

“Near Abergele, known for its sea baths, is the ogof (or cave), traditionally the refuge of Richard II. and the scene of his capture by Bolingbroke in 1399.”
– Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 2 “Demijohn” to “Destructor”